Volume 72, Issue 10 (January 2015)                   Tehran Univ Med J 2015, 72(10): 698-705 | Back to browse issues page

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Soleimani M, Shakib-Khankandi A, Ghahremanfard F, Mirmohammadkhani M. Arterial oxygen saturation and severity of nausea and vomiting during chemotherapy: A pilot study. Tehran Univ Med J. 2015; 72 (10) :698-705
URL: http://tumj.tums.ac.ir/article-1-6462-en.html
1- Department of Medical Surgical Nursing, Semnan University of Medical Sciences, Semnan, Iran
2- Critical Care Nurse Student, Nursing faculty, Semnan University of Medical Sciences, Semnan, Iran
3- Department of Internal Medicine (Oncology), Koosar Hospital, Semnan University of Medical Sciences, Semnan, Iran , f_ghahremanfard@yahoo.com
4- Research Center for Social Determinants of Health, Department of Community Medicine Semnan University of Medical Sciences, Semnan, Iran
Abstract:   (3081 Views)
Background: Nausea and vomiting is one of the most important complications in chemotherapy. Serotonin and dopamine are important neurotransmitters in nausea and vomiting. It seems that oxygen therapy and increase oxygen saturation can cause decrease these neurotransmitters. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between arterial oxygen saturation (SaO2) of patients and chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting. Methods: A descriptive-analytical study was performed in Koosar Hospital in Semnan, Iran, from 19 September 2013 to 25 April. At first, SaO2 of 30 patients in three periods (pre, during and post chemotherapy) were measured. Severity of nausea and vomiting in three days after chemotherapy was measured with an index of nausea, vomiting and retching (Rhodes Index). Also during chemotherapy, anxiety and depression of patients was measured with Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). Results: In this study thirty patients were evaluated. Most of them were women (66%) with mean age of 55.07±11.9 years old. The most common cancer in patients was breast cancer (46.7%). Mean of SaO2 was 92.1%±3.4 that was not significant difference during the chemotherapy. Mean of nausea and vomiting severity in first day of chemotherapy was (3.27±5.5), in second day was (4.5±6.2) and in third day was (7.2±8.7). The Pearson correlation coefficient did not show the relationship between oxygen saturation with severity of nausea and vomiting (P>0.05). Although severity of anxiety of patients was significant relationship with nausea and vomiting in third day (P=0.03). Conclusion: In this study there was no significant relationship between oxygen saturation and severity of nausea and vomiting, but anxiety of patients was related to nausea and vomiting in third day. Chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting was more common in third day and it seems that further research is needed for relationship between oxygen saturation and nausea and vomiting in third day of treatment.
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Type of Study: Original Article |

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